electrons's questions - Chinese 1answer

1.749 electrons questions.

After absorbing a photon with the minimum threshold frequency an electron gains energy and enters an excited state, but according to Couloumb's law a greater distance between two charges will result ...

While reading 'The Universe in a Nutshell' by Stephen Hawking, I came across the example of cards and how he used it to explain concept of spin and fermions and bosons. There he defined 'Spin' as ...

Do a moving charge let's say electron linearly with constant velocity constitue an electric current? If yes what would be it's magnitude?

When using a conductive (metal) mesh, effectively a metallic woven fabric, in vacuum applications as a "grid" for charged particle optics, how does one calculate (or at least estimate) the opacity or ...

I understand that Bohr postulated that electrons can only occupy orbits at certain radii, and that in order to move from one orbit (or stationary state) to another, it would have to absorb or emit a ...

Why not free electrons in atom doesn't radiates em waves\photons, although they move with acceleration? Like 1s electron of Titan, it doesn't emits em waves, yes? Why?

Consider two cylindrical conductor rods: one copper rod and one aluminium rod. The rods contact at a circular face, aligned coaxially. Their exterior circular faces are connected to some DC voltage. ...

On the wikipedia page about electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR), they define what they call 'the anomalous coordinate,' which is $ \textbf{r}_{so} \approx \frac{\hbar^2 |g|k}{m_0 E_G}$. Apparently, ...

In the paragraph 1–2 "Matter is made of atoms" of the first Volume of his lectures, the great Feynman says that electrons are in a perpetual motion. Now, i'm new to physics and i don't know quantum ...

I don't know much more than the basics of the theory, so if my question stops making sense at some point, an answer addressing that would be awesome. From what I understand so far, photon creation ...

I've just started learning about the double slit experiment (just in the short appendix section in Schroeder's Thermal Physics), and I'm extremely confused by this one thing: In it, out of basically ...

And I mean really slow. I don't know how this would even be done, but just a thought experiment. To explain why I ask this, the way I understand the phrase "we can't know the momentum and position ...

Please adise if possible. Thanks. Im designing a tungsten coated business card to help shield against EMR from cell towers. If I electro charge it (on a wireless phone charger) will the tungsten ...

I know that electrons' only interaction with the higgs field is due to ambidextrousness and the weak hypercharge which is provided by the higgs boson, but how do quarks (specifically up and down) ...

Will the electric field of an induced dipole in an insulator match the electric field inducing it but in the opposite direction? I have 2 counter theories: Let's say I place an insulator (and let's ...

If I double the electric field, that should double the acceleration of electrons inside the conductor in the general direction of the electric field. But why does that double the drift velocity, and ...

For a battery with a given voltage, how would we calculate the electric field? Thanks!

When Geiger and Marsden shot alpha particles at their metal foils, they noticed only a tiny fraction of the alpha particles were deflected by more than 90°. Most just flew straight through the foil. ...

I have read multiple answers on StackExchange about this question, but I wasn't able to find a concrete answer. Like other questions, the reason I ask about the $s$-orbital is because it has a zero ...

I can't for the life of me figure this out. I feel like i'm missing some crucial detail about how batteries work. Imagine two batteries connected in series, like this: ...

So due to electron-electron repulsion, isnt it true that surfaces dont really 'touch'? If so, then how do two things rubbing each other give out sound due to friction? or is that because the uneven ...

My question is regarding the fact that magnetic field is generated only by moving charge and it can act only on charged moving particles. So if we have two cathode rays one, by the other and its ...

I'm a super amateur wannabe physicist, and I'm trying to learn the fundamental workings of the photovoltaic effect. I haven't been able to understand "how" or "what" is displaced/transmitted in the ...

Since beta-particles are just free-moving electrons, shouldn't they be caught by strongly-electronegative atoms and thus create anions? Why do they instead create more cations by knocking other ...

Due to Wikipedia the total energy per unit volume stored in an electromagnetic field is $$u_{EM}=\frac{\varepsilon}{2}|\mathbb E|^2+\frac{1}{2\mu}|\mathbb B|^2$$ How does the energy stored in the ...

I've been asked to estimate the number of electrons in a metal, and the number of electrons available for conduction. I don't want to use proper Fermi-Dirac or anything, I just want an easy way to ...

When we connect two resistors connected in parallel with a battery, it creates an electric field through this wire. well, my question here: Is the electric field in the main wire is the same as the ...

How can you talk about two electrons if they are identical (indistinguible)? Does it make sense to let an electron to have an identity by itself? If they are on diferent places the place they are is ...

I'm trying to understand the tight binding method but I'm struggling with a lot of the mathematical formalism. A lot of the mathematical formalism I read jumps into explaining it a few too many steps ...

We start the process with gamma rays collision that produces positron electron pair, the pair then annihilates when hit each other and gamma rays are produced again and everything repeats. Sure, in ...

In this pdf it says Because the number of electron states in a Brillouin zone is twice the number of primitive cells in a Bravais lattice (the factor two comes from spin), the zone can be ...

"When excess charge is placed on a solid conductor and is at rest, it resides entirely on the surface, not in the interior of the material. �" Source: University physics 13th edition p(736). ...

In the Standard Model, neutrinos are assumed to be massless, and the right-handed neutrinos thus do not exit. Is this the reason that the right-handed electron is regarded as an $SU(2)$ singlet? ...

The formulation is provocative, the question is similar to the question here. There I can follow the question, but not the answers, which for me imply that an electron in a momentum eigenstate does ...

I was doing a quantum physics past paper and there was this question about ionizing atoms with laser. My answers made reference to the photons within the laser knocking off or transferring their ...

Speed of electron and proton in electric field. In a uniform electric field E, the acceleration of an electron in vacuum is 1836 times that of a proton (proton/electron mass ratio is 1836). I'll like ...

I know sometimes electrons behave like waves, but it sometimes can be seen as a particle. while it's a particle, does it have a radius? or, a volume? If it doesn't even have a volume, how can we still ...

All throughout my homework the lowest electron level (ground state) is never referred to as a number. Is it possible to calculate it numerically? I have wondered this because a question asked "what ...

In atoms, what force or charge, etc. keeps electrons from flying away or into their nucleus? is there a kind of weak-force at work on the atomic scale? Note I am aware the electron positions are ...

Every system with $N$ or more electrons lies in a Hilbert space $H=H_{\text{space}} \otimes H_{\text{spin}}$, with $H_{\text{space}}=H_{\text{space}}^{1}\otimes\cdots\otimes H_{\text{space}}^{N}$ and $...

I know that intensity determines the no. of electrons and the current produced. But if the intensity is constant and the frequency changes, the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons changes, so their ...

More intensity means more number of electrons so more probability of there being energetic electrons reaching the collecting plate so the stopping potential should technically be more. But all the ...

I have read this question: This question is not about the energy levels, negative and kinetic, why it is lower (more negative) close to the nucleus. I understand those. I understand electrons have ...

I referred to some of the questions about Hund's rule on StackExchange, such as this for example, but still wasn't able to have my question resolved. (the wikiepdia page has $E_{ex} = C - \frac{1}{2}...

The hydrogen spectrum appears when an electron absorbs a photon, jumps an orbital, and then releases that photon in an effort to get back to its ground state. From what I've read electricity is ...

I am a little bit confused here. When a metallic nanoparticle is impinged with light at its resonance, the electric field is greatly enhanced at the surface along the polarisation of the wave(suppose ...

Here, under the subtitle 'principle,' it describes what happens when you have a static magnetic field along the z axis, $ B_0 \hat{z}$ and microwave field parallel to the $x$ axis, $ B_1 \hat{x}$. I ...

Can we create an electric field without actually using a battery or a source of electricity? Like a take 2 panels, one is positively charged and another is negatively charged and put them parallel to ...

I am looking at device architecture of planar heterojunction solar cell. What I understand from reading "Planar heterojunction organometal halide perovskite solar cells: roles of interfacial layers" (...

According to Wikipedia : "An electric potential (also called the electric field potential, potential drop or the electrostatic potential) is the amount of work needed to move a unit positive charge ...

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